Salve Regina University

Table of Contents

  1. Administrative

    1. 51 Shepard Ave.
    2. 54 East Bowery St.
    3. Drexel Hall
    4. Munroe Center
    5. Ochre Court
    6. President's House
    7. Stonor Hall
    8. Tobin Hall
    9. Young Building
  2. Academic

    1. 162 Webster St.
    2. Angelus Hall
    3. Antone Academic Center
    4. Casino Theatre
    5. Center for Adult Education
    6. Marian Hall
    7. McAuley Hall
    8. McKillop Library
    9. Misto Gatehouse
    10. O'Hare Academic Center
  3. Student

    1. Miley Hall
    2. Our Lady of Mercy Chapel
    3. Rodgers Recreation Center
    4. Wakehurst
  4. Campus Dining

    1. Global Café
    2. Jazzman's Café
    3. Miley Hall
    4. Starbucks/Miley Mart
  5. Athletics

    1. Lawrence Avenue Field
    2. Reynolds Field
    3. Rodgers Recreation Center
    4. Tennis Courts
  6. Trees at Salve Regina

    1. Beech Tricolor
    2. Beech Weeping Purple Fountain
    3. Blue atlas cedar at McKillop Library
    4. Blue atlas cedar at Wakehurst
    5. Cedar of Lebanon at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy
    6. Copper beech at Our Lady of Mercy Chapel
    7. Copper beech at Wakehurst
    8. Copper beech at Wakehurst
    9. English elm at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy
    10. English oak at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy
    11. European Green Beech
    12. European beech at Angelus Hall
    13. European beech at McAuley Hall
    14. European beech at McAuley Hall
    15. European beech at McKillop Library
    16. European beech at McKillop Library/Munroe Center
    17. European beech at McKillop Library/Munroe Center
    18. European beech at O'Hare Academic Center
    19. European beech at Our Lady of Mercy Chapel
    20. European beech at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy
    21. European beech at Wakehurst
    22. European hornbeam at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy
    23. European hornbeam at Rodgers Recreation Center
    24. Fernleaf Beech
    25. Fernleaf beech
    26. Flowering Cherry Yoshino
    27. Ginkgo at Miley Hall
    28. Ginkgo at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy
    29. Horse chestnut at O'Hare Academic Center
    30. Japanese cryptomeria at Wakehurst
    31. Japanese maple at Miley Hall
    32. Japanese maple at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy
    33. Katsura
    34. Kousa dogwood at O'Hare Academic Center
    35. Linden Americana Redmond
    36. Littleleaf linden at McKillop Library/Munroe Center
    37. Littleleaf linden at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy
    38. Littleleaf linden at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy
    39. Littleleaf linden at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy
    40. Littleleaf linden at Wakehurst
    41. London plane tree at Miley Hall
    42. London plane tree at Miley Hall
    43. London plane tree at Wakehurst
    44. Oriental spruce at McKillop Library
    45. Oriental spruce at McKillop Library/Munroe Center
    46. Pear trees at Ochre Court
    47. River birch at O'Hare Academic Center
    48. Sawara False Cypress at Ochre Court
    49. Sawtooth oak at Rodgers Recreation Center
    50. Tuliptree at Miley Hall
    51. Turkish oak at McKillop Library
    52. Turkish oak at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy
    53. Turkish oak at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy
    54. Umbrella pine at McKillop Library
    55. Weeping Purple Fountain
    56. Weeping european beech at McKillop Library
    57. Weeping european beech at Miley Hall
    58. Western red cedar at Wakehurst
    59. Yew at McKillop Library
    60. Zelkova Green Vase
  7. First Year Housing

    1. Hunt/Reefe Halls
    2. Miley Hall
    3. Walgreen Hall
  8. Upperclassmen Housing

    1. 134 Webster St.
    2. 204 Ruggles Ave.
    3. 26 Lawrence Ave.
    4. 74 Victoria Ave.
    5. 80 Victoria Ave.
    6. 87 Victoria Ave.
    7. Carnlough Cottage
    8. Carolyn House
    9. Conley Hall
    10. Fairlawn Apartments
    11. Founders Hall
    12. French Cottage
    13. Graystone Cottages
    14. Moore Hall
    15. Narragansett Hall
    16. Narragansett I and II
    17. Nethercliffe
    18. Nethercliffe Carriage House
    19. Ochre Lodge
    20. Stoneacre
    21. The Hedges
    22. Wallace Hall
    23. William Watts Sherman House
    24. Young Building
  9. On-Campus Shuttle Stops

    1. Antone Academic Center (Shuttle Stop)
    2. Conley Hall (Shuttle Stop)
    3. Founders Hall (Shuttle Stop)
    4. Miley Hall (Shuttle Stop)
    5. Narragansett Ave. (Shuttle Stop)
    6. Our Lady of Mercy Chapel (Shuttle Stop)
    7. Reefe Hall (Shuttle Stop)
    8. Reynolds Field (Shuttle Stop)
    9. Rodgers Recreation Center (Shuttle Stop)
    10. Stoneacre (Shuttle Stop)
    11. William Watts Sherman House (Shuttle Stop)
  10. Parking

    1. 26 Lawrence Ave. (Student)
    2. 74 Victoria Ave. (Student)
    3. 80 Victoria Ave. (Student)
    4. Antone Academic Center (Commuter, Faculty and Staff)
    5. Carnlough Cottage (Student)
    6. Drexel Lot (Commuter, Faculty and Staff)
    7. Founders Hall (Student)
    8. Hedges (Student)
    9. Hunt/Reefe (Student)
    10. Lawrence Ave. (Commuter)
    11. Leroy Ave. (Commuter)
    12. Leroy Ave. (Faculty and Staff)
    13. McAuley (Faculty and Staff)
    14. McKillop Library (Faculty and Staff)
    15. McKillop Library (Faculty and Staff)
    16. Miley Hall (Faculty and Staff)
    17. Monroe Center (Commuter)
    18. Moore Hall (Student)
    19. O'Hare Academic Center (Faculty and Staff)
    20. Ochre Court (Faculty and Staff)
    21. Ochre Court (Prospective Families Overflow)
    22. Ochre Court (Prospective Families)
    23. Ochre Point Ave. (Communter)
    24. Rodgers Recreation Center (Commuter, Faculty and Staff)
    25. Ruggles Ave. (Student)
    26. Shepard Ave. (Commuter)
    27. Stoneacre (Student)
    28. Stonor (Commuter, Faculty and Staff)
    29. Wakehurst (Faculty and Staff)
    30. Wallace Hall (Student)
    31. Webster St. (Commuter)
    32. Webster St. (Prospective Families)
    33. William Watts Sherman (Student)
    34. Young Building (Commuter, Faculty and Staff)
    35. Young Building (Student)

Tours

Tree Walking Tour

  1. Japanese maple at Miley Hall
  2. London plane tree at Miley Hall
  3. Sawtooth oak at Rodgers Recreation Center
  4. European hornbeam at Rodgers Recreation Center
  5. Sawara False Cypress at Ochre Court
  6. Copper beech at Our Lady of Mercy Chapel
  7. Kousa dogwood at O'Hare Academic Center
  8. European beech at McKillop Library/Munroe Center
  9. Oriental spruce at McKillop Library/Munroe Center
  10. Weeping european beech at McKillop Library
  11. Copper beech at Wakehurst
  12. Yew at McKillop Library
  13. European beech at Wakehurst

Admission Campus Tour

  1. Ochre Court
  2. Miley Hall
  3. Rodgers Recreation Center
  4. Antone Academic Center
  5. Wakehurst
  6. McKillop Library
  7. Hunt/Reefe Halls
  8. O'Hare Academic Center
  9. McAuley Hall
  10. Our Lady of Mercy Chapel

Residence Halls

  1. Miley Hall
  2. Walgreen Hall
  3. Narragansett I and II
  4. Narragansett Hall
  5. 134 Webster St.
  6. Hunt/Reefe Halls
  7. Ochre Lodge
  8. Carolyn House
  9. Nethercliffe
  10. Nethercliffe Carriage House
  11. Graystone Cottages
  12. The Hedges
  13. Founders Hall
  14. 87 Victoria Ave.
  15. 80 Victoria Ave.
  16. 74 Victoria Ave.
  17. Wallace Hall
  18. 204 Ruggles Ave.
  19. Stoneacre
  20. Fairlawn Apartments
  21. French Cottage
  22. Young Building
  23. William Watts Sherman House
  24. Carnlough Cottage
  25. Moore Hall
  26. 26 Lawrence Ave.

Advanced Studio Concepts Campus Wide Art Installations

  1. "Miss, Have, Want" By Pansela Schaetzle
  2. "Synthesize" By Kristen Maliszewski
  3. "Linus pro omnibus omnes pro uno" By Mary Kate Hickey
  4. "Mentality" By Isabella Tomlinson
  5. "Evolution" By Alyssa Pascerella
  6. "Washed Walls" By Emily Lipka
  7. "Kaleidoscope" By Katie Roman
  8. "The Artistic Mean" By Lauren Calder
  9. "Imperfection is Beautiful" By Diana Ostiguy
  10. "More" By Molly Harrington
  11. "View to the Past" By Zachary Mafera
  12. "Arboreal Endangerment" By Clara Corjulo

Content

Administrative

51 Shepard Ave.

51 Shepard Ave. houses the Office of Graduate Studies and Continuing Education. Constructed in 1950, the shingled cottage was acquired by Salve Regina in 2004.

54 East Bowery St.

54 East Bowery St. houses the offices and trade shops of the facilities department. After investing nearly three years and $2 million to purchase, cleanse and rebuild on the site of the former Lincourt Auto Body Shop, the University opened this shingle-style structure in 2003.

Drexel Hall

The Office of International Programs, which coordinates study abroad experiences and provides support to international students, is located in Drexel Hall. Along with Stonor Hall, Drexel is the former hennery and hen keeper's cottage for Catherine Lorillard Wolfe's sprawling Vinland estate.

Munroe Center

The Munroe Center serves as Salve Regina's technological headquarters. Conceptualized by Charles Eamer Kempe as the stables for the Wakehurst estate, this rusticated stone carriage house echoes the Gothic lines and English manor style of the estate's primary structure.

Ochre Court

A "one-stop shop" for students and visitors alike, Ochre Court houses the Office of the President, the Business Office and the offices of Undergraduate Admission, Financial Aid and the Registrar, among others. Concerts, student dances, lectures and special functions are held on the first floor throughout the year.

Designed by Richard Morris Hunt, America's foremost architect of the late 19th century, Ochre Court was commissioned by New York banker and real estate magnate Ogden Goelet as his family's summer residence. It was the Goelet family's gift of Ochre Court in 1947 that allowed the Sisters of Mercy to open Salve Regina College.

President's House

Formerly the carriage house and stables for William Watts Sherman's estate, this house has served as the president's residence since 1994, and was previously used as a student residence. Designed by architect Henry Hobson Richardson, this Queen Anne-style structure combines English, German and American Colonial influences.

Stonor Hall

Stonor Hall houses the offices of Conferences and Events and Human Resources. Along with Drexel Hall, Stonor is the former hennery and hen keeper's cottage for Catherine Lorillard Wolfe's sprawling Vinland estate.

Tobin Hall

Tobin Hall houses the Office of Safety and Security. The former gardener's cottage for Catherine Lorillard Wolfe's sprawling Vinland estate, the Colonial Revival structure was completed in 1884. In 2002, Salve Regina received a historic preservation award from the Newport Historical Society for Tobin Hall's exterior restoration.

Young Building

The Young Building houses the Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy and serves as a residence hall for upperclassmen students.

 

Built in the 1850s, the Queen Anne-style mansion has undergone several alterations over the years, including the addition of a ballroom and the installation of Tiffany stained glass windows in the great hall. In 1999, the University received a historic preservation award from the Newport Historical Society for the Young Building's restoration.

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Academic

162 Webster St.

162 Webster St. is home to the University's holistic graduate programs, including the expressive and creative arts, holistic counseling and holistic leadership programs. Constructed in 1960, the shingled ranch house was acquired by Salve Regina in 2001.

Angelus Hall

Angelus Hall houses faculty offices and classrooms for the Department of Music, Theatre and Dance, specifically the music program. The former carriage house for Catherine Lorillard Wolfe's sprawling Vinland estate, the property was acquired by Salve Regina in 1955.

Antone Academic Center

The Antone Academic Center houses performance areas, studios, offices, classrooms and laboratories for several academic departments and programs, including American studies, art, cultural and historic preservation, English, history and sociology.

 

Also inside is the Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery, which features the work of Salve students, faculty, alumni and outstanding regional, national and international artists.

 

Creation of the Antone Academic Center involved the unique restoration, renovation and union of two nationally historic and significant complexes - Wetmore Hall, the original carriage house and stables for Chateau-sur-Mer, and Mercy Hall, the original carriage house and stables for Ochre Court.

Casino Theatre

Casino Theatre

Center for Adult Education

Opened in 2012, the Center for Adult Education in Warwick, R.I., provides instructional, student and faculty space in a location convenient to students in Greater Providence. Located at 144 Metro Center Blvd., the center offers graduate and continuing education courses year-round in both the traditional classroom and hybrid formats.

Marian Hall

Marian Hall houses faculty offices for the departments of philosophy and religious and theological studies. Designed by the famed architectural firm of Peabody & Stearns, this former caretaker's cottage was added to Catherine Lorillard Wolfe's sprawling Vinland estate in the early 1900s.

McAuley Hall

Having served the University as both residence hall and library, McAuley Hall now houses classrooms, offices and academic departments, including administration of justice, education, political science and psychology.

 

Designed by the famed architectural firm of Peabody & Stearns, McAuley Hall is the former centerpiece of tobacco heiress Catherine Lorillard Wolfe’s sprawling Vinland estate. Planned by noted landscape architect Ernest Bowditch, the grounds feature a pair of 90-foot, century-old beech trees and a large dolium near the main entrance that was excavated from an Italian garden and dates to 200 B.C.

McKillop Library

The McKillop Library is a state-of-the-art facility that holds approximately 150,000 volumes and also accommodates computer labs, the Academic Center for Excellence and the Center for Teaching and Learning. The spacious, comfortable atmosphere provides plenty of room for individual and group study, along with a Learning Commons and an electronic classroom for instructional purposes.

Misto Gatehouse

The Gatehouse houses the Office of Arts and Sciences. The former gardener's cottage for Catherine Lorillard Wolfe's sprawling Vinland estate, the structure's turrets, gables and wrought-iron lanterns presented a storybook welcome as guests entered the sweeping curve of Vinland's driveway.

O'Hare Academic Center

The academic hub of campus, O’Hare Academic Center houses classrooms, state-of-the-art laboratories, faculty offices, the Bazarsky Lecture Hall and Jazzman’s Cafe. In 2015, the University broke ground on a major renovation and addition, which is designed to create new, signature spaces for several academic departments, including biology, business, chemistry, math, nursing and social work.

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Student

Miley Hall

Miley Hall is a traditional residence hall that accommodates first-year students and also houses the cafeteria, Miley Mart/Starbucks, bookstore and offices for the Center for Student Development, Counseling Services, Health Services and Student Affairs. Students are housed on three floors, with males on the first floor and females on the second and third floors.

 

As Salve Regina's main dining hall, the cafeteria offers daily breakfast, lunch and dinner. Features include the Mongolian grill, brick oven pizza, daily pasta specials, made-to-order deli, soups and salad bar. My Zone provides a separate pantry for students with allergies such as gluten, lactose, wheat, soy and peanut.

 

Miley Mart, a retail convenience store located in the lower level, features hot or iced Starbucks coffee and drinks, along with a complete line of snacks, candy, bottled beverages, frozen entrees, ice cream, canned and paper goods and health and beauty products.

Our Lady of Mercy Chapel

Consecrated in 2010, Our Lady of Mercy Chapel offers regular services and allows weddings to be celebrated on campus in a religious setting. The first floor houses both the chapel and an interfaith prayer room. The Mercy Center for Spiritual Life, located on the lower level, is a welcoming space that hosts student activities, fellowship and offices for campus ministers.

 

Designed by award-winning architect Robert A.M. Stern, the stone and shingle exterior complements the historic architecture of the neighborhood. Features include a set of 13 leaded opalescent glass windows created by renowned artist John La Farge and a bell tower housing three 1910 bells cast by the Meneely Bell Company.

Rodgers Recreation Center

Dedicated in 2000, the Rodgers Recreation Center houses the University's athletic and recreational facilities, including the gymnasium, fitness center, aerobics studio, training rooms and a Hall of Fame area.

 

Designed by renowned architect Robert A.M. Stern, the facility's innovative design is a fitting modern counterpart to its Gilded Age neighbors. The Shingle-style exterior echoes McKim, Mead & White's Newport Casino and the Isaac Bell House.

Basketball and volleyball use Rodgers Recreation Center.  

Wakehurst

A hub for student activities, Wakehurst also houses classrooms and offices. On the first floor is the Global Cafe, a gaming room and the fireplace lounge, where many campus events are held. The lower level is home to the bicycle loan program, student mailroom, the Office of Student Activities, the WSRU radio station and a lounge.

 

The second floor features classrooms, a club resource room, the Office of Community Service, the Student Government Association, Campus Activities Board, Willow and Mosaic offices and a study lounge.

 

Built for renowned anglophile James J. Van Alen and completed in 1887, Wakehurst is an exact replica of an Elizabethan manor house in England. Salve Regina acquired the property from the Van Alen family in 1972.

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Campus Dining

Global Café

Located in Wakehurst, Global Café features salads, sandwiches, soups, milkshakes, coffee, muffins, yogurt parfaits and assorted packaged snacks.

Jazzman's Café

Located in the O'Hare Academic Center lobby, Jazzman's Café offers fresh brewed coffee, espresso and cappuccino, along with baked goods, sandwiches, salads and bottled beverages.

Miley Hall

Miley Hall is a traditional residence hall that accommodates first-year students and also houses the cafeteria, Miley Mart/Starbucks, bookstore and offices for the Center for Student Development, Counseling Services, Health Services and Student Affairs. Students are housed on three floors, with males on the first floor and females on the second and third floors.

 

As Salve Regina's main dining hall, the cafeteria offers daily breakfast, lunch and dinner. Features include the Mongolian grill, brick oven pizza, daily pasta specials, made-to-order deli, soups and salad bar. My Zone provides a separate pantry for students with allergies such as gluten, lactose, wheat, soy and peanut.

 

Miley Mart, a retail convenience store located in the lower level, features hot or iced Starbucks coffee and drinks, along with a complete line of snacks, candy, bottled beverages, frozen entrees, ice cream, canned and paper goods and health and beauty products.

Starbucks/Miley Mart

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Athletics

Lawrence Avenue Field

This field is used as a practice field for field hockey, lacrosse and soccer. 

Reynolds Field

Baseball and soccer use Reynolds Field. 

Rodgers Recreation Center

Dedicated in 2000, the Rodgers Recreation Center houses the University's athletic and recreational facilities, including the gymnasium, fitness center, aerobics studio, training rooms and a Hall of Fame area.

 

Designed by renowned architect Robert A.M. Stern, the facility's innovative design is a fitting modern counterpart to its Gilded Age neighbors. The Shingle-style exterior echoes McKim, Mead & White's Newport Casino and the Isaac Bell House.

Basketball and volleyball use Rodgers Recreation Center.  

Tennis Courts

Salve Regina Tennis uses the on campus courts. 

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Trees at Salve Regina

Beech Tricolor

Beech Weeping Purple Fountain

Blue atlas cedar at McKillop Library

Blue Atlas cedar

Scientific name: Cedrus atlantica

Age: Mature

 

The blue Atlas cedar is native to Morocco and the Atlas Mountains of Algeria. President Jimmy Carter designed and built a treehouse in the blue Atlas cedar on the south lawn of the White House for his daughter Amy. It is self-supporting so that it does not damage the tree.

 

Blue atlas cedar at Wakehurst

Blue atlas cedar

Scientific name: Cedrus atlantica

Age: Semi-mature

 

Forming vast forests in the mountains of Algeria, the blue Atlas cedar is valued in the landscape because of its tolerance to both heat and drought, enabling it to grow further south than any other coniferous tree.

 

Cedar of Lebanon at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy

Cedar of Lebanon

Scientific name: Cedrus libani

Age: Mature

 

Native to the mountains of south central Turkey, western Syria and Lebanon, the cedar of Lebanon holds cultural importance to many civilizations. Often requested by kings for the construction of sacred buildings, its wood was used in the building of Solomon's tomb.

 

Copper beech at Our Lady of Mercy Chapel

Copper beech


Scientific name: Fagus sylvatica


Age: Semi-mature

Copper beech at Wakehurst

Copper beech


Scientific name: Fagus sylvatica


Age: Mature


 









This is one of three copper beeches that surround the labyrinth. Copper beech trees are a cultivar of the common European beech trees that were listed in the catalogue of the Linnean Botanic Garden in Flushing, Long Island in 1790. They arrived in Newport during the Gilded Age.

 

Copper beech at Wakehurst

Copper beech


Scientific name: Fagus sylvatica


Age: Mature


 









Introduced to North America in the 18th century, the copper beech remains a viable species in the Northeast. The original cultivars, "Atropunicea," would have been sourced from Thuringia, Germany. In the Northeast, copper beech trees have lifespans of approximately 130 years.

 

English elm at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy

English elm

Scientific name: Ulmus procera

Age: Semi-mature

English oak at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy

English oak

Scientific name: Quercus robur

Age: Mature

 

The largest English oak, the majesy oak, stands in Great Britain with a 12.7-foot diameter. Quercus robur have been known to live up to 1,500 years, and therefore are associated with strength and endurance by many nations and cultures.

 

It has been said that "every oak tree was once a nut that stood its ground." This English oak represents a majestic sprawling form of oak, with ultimate trunk diameters ranging from 4 to 12 feet. It is a white oak with delicately lobed leaves.

 

European Green Beech

European beech at Angelus Hall

European beech


Scientific name: Fagus sylvatica


Age: Semi-mature

European beech at McAuley Hall

European beech




Scientific name: Fagus sylvatica




Age: Mature




 


















Beech is a dominant species in both southern England and France. One of the most beautiful beech forests, the Sonian forest, is found in Brussels, Belgium.



 

European beech at McAuley Hall

European beech




Scientific name: Fagus sylvatica




Age: Semi-Mature




 


















The world's largest beech forest is in Semenic-Cheile Carasului National Park in Romania, which consists of more than 12,000 acres. Many trees in this area are more than 350 years old.



 

European beech at McKillop Library

European beech


Scientific name: Fagus sylvatica


Age: Mature

European beech at McKillop Library/Munroe Center

European beech






Scientific name: Fagus sylvatica






Age: Mature



























The European beech invests much of its energy in summer and fall for the following spring. After a period of dormancy in July, its roots expand and gather nutrients, which are stored for use the following spring.





 

European beech at McKillop Library/Munroe Center

European beech


Scientific name: Fagus sylvatica


Age: Mature


 









The wood of the European beech is without flavor. It is traditionally used to make cups, plates, salt and pepper shakers, and water storage barrels. It is also used in minor carpentry, from chairs to staircases to flooring. Its hard wood is also used to make mallets and workbench tops.

 

European beech at O'Hare Academic Center

European beech


Scientific name: Fagus sylvatica


Age: Mature


 









Evidence suggests that the beech tree may have been brought to England 2,000 years after the English Channel was formed - 4,000 years before the Christian Era.

 

European beech at Our Lady of Mercy Chapel

European beech


Scientific name: Fagus sylvatica


Age: Mature


 









Though beech trees tolerate a range of soil types, they have other very specific requirements to reach their maximum life span. They prefer a humid atmosphere, partial shade and well drained, slightly acidic soil. They tolerate the bitter cold but may be sensitive to spring frost.

 

European beech at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy

European beech

Scientific name: Fagus sylvatica

Age: Mature

 

In large quantities, beech nuts are slightly toxic to humans unless the tannins are leached out before eating (which also improves the flavor). After roasting, they can be ground to make a fine flour.

European beech at Wakehurst

European beech


Scientific name: Fagus sylvatica


Age: Mature

European hornbeam at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy

European hornbeam

Scientific name: Carpinus betulus

Age: Semi-mature

 

The European hornbeam withstands heavy pruning, making it suitable for pleaching and pollarding, which are both formal methods of hedge pruning. Pollarding allowed Europeans to prune trees such as hornbeam for their "faggots." This allowed for the harvesting of wood without losing the hedge effect of the tree.

 

European hornbeam at Rodgers Recreation Center

European hornbeam




Scientific name: Carpinus betulus




Age: Semi-mature




 


















Carpinus betulus or European hornbeam is native to Europe as far east as Russia and the Ukraine. Its wood is very hard and slow burning, making it suitable for wood-burning fuel.

Fernleaf Beech

Fernleaf beech

Flowering Cherry Yoshino

Ginkgo at Miley Hall

Ginko


Scientific name: Ginko biloba


Age: Semi-mature


 









Ginkgo biloba is considered to be a living fossil, dating back 270 million years. It is a genus that has only one surviving species, which is native to China. The extract from ginkgo biloba is used pharmaceutically for memory and concentration.

 

Ginkgo at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy

Ginkgo

Scientific name: Ginko biloba

Age: Semi-mature

 

Ginkgo biloba or maidenhair tree is one of the best-known examples of a living fossil. A species native to China, it was brought to estate properties in Newport during the Gilded Age.

 

Horse chestnut at O'Hare Academic Center

Horse chestnut


Scientific name: Aesculus hippocastanum


Age: Mature

Japanese cryptomeria at Wakehurst

Japanese cryptomeria

Scientific name: Cryptomeria japonica

Age: Mature

 

Cryptomeria is a genus of conifer within the cypress family. It is native to Japan, where it is known as Sugi. As it loses its lower limbs, its red peeling bark becomes highlighted, especially in the fall and winter months.

 

Japanese maple at Miley Hall

Japanese maple


Scientific name: Acer palmatum


Age: Mature

Japanese maple at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy

Japanese maple

Scientific name: Acer palmatum

Age: Mature

 

Acer palmatum or Japanese maple is native to Korea, China and Japan. There are more than 1,000 cultivars of this species, all propagated by grafting. Cultivars are differentiated by leaf texture, size and shape, along with variations in bark color ranging from gray to brown to red. The most commonly cultivated form is called "Bloodgood" for its red leaves.

 

Katsura

Kousa dogwood at O'Hare Academic Center

Kousa dogwood




Scientific name: Cornus kousa




Age: Mature




 


















Kousa dogwoods are native to eastern Asia. Their flowers bloom prolifically in late spring, although the showy portion is actually the bract that sits just below the yellowish-green flowers. The red berries are edible, but preferred by birds because of their lack of taste to humans.



 

Linden Americana Redmond

Littleleaf linden at McKillop Library/Munroe Center

Littleleaf linden


Scientific name: Tilia cordata


Age: Mature


 









A finely textured soft wood with close grains, linden is used for carving and lightweight framing. It has been used to carve cigar-store Indians, ship figureheads, wagon boxes and furniture. Today it is used to make window sashes and lightweight toys. The species has always been associated with treehouses - the British would build spiral staircases that climbed to the heights of "green rooms," where it was said they could entertain up to 30 guests.

 

Littleleaf linden at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy

littleleaf linden

Scientific name: Tilia cordata

Age: Mature

Littleleaf linden at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy

littleleaf linden

Scientific name: Tilia cordata

Age: Mature

 

The oldest lindens in the world are in England, Germany and Slovakia. The Slavs consider the linden tree - with its heart-shaped leaves pointing to the heavens - to be a symbol of ancestry. This linden has borne witness to at least five American generations.

 

Littleleaf linden at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy

littleleaf linden

Scientific name: Tilia cordata

Age: Mature

 

Tilia, or linden, is a genus that represents approximately 30 species. In Europe, it is also known as basswood or lime tree. According to the Illustrated Encyclopedia of Trees and Shrubs, the most famous street in Berlin, Germany is called Unter den Linden (Under the Lindens), named after the lindens lining the boulevard. In German folklore, the linden is the "tree of lovers."

Littleleaf linden at Wakehurst

littleleaf linden


Scientific name: Tilia cordata


Age: Mature


 









Native to Europe, western Asia and Great Britain, the littleleaf linden was a Colonial introduction that replaced American linden because European trees were thought to be superior to American species. Its dark wood, which reaches heights of 60-80 feet, provides unique contrast with the delicate textures of its leaves, especially as they move within the summer breezes of Newport. Its fragrant flowers can be used to make medicinal teas, its nectar is valued as a monofloral honey and its leaves can be eaten as a salad vegetable.

 

London plane tree at Miley Hall

London plane tree


Scientific name: Platanus x acerifolia


Age: Mature


 

London plane tree at Miley Hall

London plane tree


Scientific name: Platanus x acerifolia


Age: Mature


 









The London plane tree is a cross between the Oriental plane and the American plane. In an ironic twist of fate, Europeans had collected Platanus species in the 18th century from both North America and Asia. The two species, Occidentalis and Orientalis, accidentally crossed and came back to the Americas as the London plane tree. Because it grows in very harsh conditions, it has become a highly planted tree in cities such as Philadelphia, New York, Boston and Chicago.

 

London plane tree at Wakehurst

London plane tree

Scientific name: Platanus x acerifolia

Age: Mature

 

It has been said that settlers cut down most of the trees on Aquidneck Island, and those that remained were cut down during the British occupation of Newport out of spite, as the British did not want to leave valuable wood resources behind for the rebels. The unusual form that this London plane has taken is probably a result of exposure to the coastal winds that once swept the deforested properties of Newport.

 

Oriental spruce at McKillop Library

Spruce oriental

Scientific name: Picea orientalis

Age: Mature

Oriental spruce at McKillop Library/Munroe Center

Oriental spruce


Scientific name: Picea orientalis


Age: Mature

Pear trees at Ochre Court

Pear trees


Scientific name: Pyrus calleryana


Age: Semi-mature

River birch at O'Hare Academic Center

River birch


Scientific name: Betula nigra


Age: Over-mature

Sawara False Cypress at Ochre Court

Sawara False Cypress


Scientific name: Chamaecyparis pisifera


Age: Mature

Sawtooth oak at Rodgers Recreation Center

Sawtooth oak


Scientific name: Quercus acutissima


Age: Semi-mature


 









Native to Asia and widely planted in North America, the sawtooth oak is a fast-growing species that can reach heights ranging from 80 to 100 feet. Closely related to the Turkish oak, it is often planted as a source of food for wildlife such as jays, pigeons and squirrels.

 

Tuliptree at Miley Hall

Tuliptree


Scientific name: Liriodendron tulipifera


Age: Mature


 









Liriodendron tulipifera, or tulip tree, is part of the magnolia family. Native to North America, it is found from Tennessee to Georgia and west to the Mississippi River, and sparingly in New England. A fast-growing tree, it can reach heights up to 180 feet in its native ranges.

 

Turkish oak at McKillop Library

Turkish oak

Scientific name: Quercus cerris

Age: Mature

Turkish oak at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy

Turkish oak

Turkish oak at Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy

Turkish oak

Scientific name: Quercus cerris

Age: Mature

Umbrella pine at McKillop Library

Umbrella pine

Scientific name: Sciadopitys verticllata

Age: Semi-mature

Weeping Purple Fountain

Weeping european beech at McKillop Library

Weeping european beech


Scientific name: Fagus sylvatica


Age: Mature


 









This is one of the most magnificent weeping beech trees in Newport. Its location behind the library is fitting, as the word "book" is related to the word "beech": The Dutch word for book is "boek." In Russian, the word for beech is "buk." In Swedish, "bok" means both book and beech.

 

Weeping european beech at Miley Hall

Weeping european beech


Scientific name: Fagus sylvatica


Age: Mature


 









It is said that the ancients used the huge bowls of beech trees to carve their lovers' names and important dates to preserve them throughout the ages.

 

Western red cedar at Wakehurst

Western red cedar

Scientific name: Thuja plicata

Age: Mature

Yew at McKillop Library

Yew

Scientific name: Taxus sp

Age: Semi-mature

Zelkova Green Vase

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First Year Housing

Hunt/Reefe Halls

Co-ed by room, Hunt Hall and Reefe Hall are traditional residence halls with private bathrooms. First-year students are housed in Reefe Hall, while sophomores are housed in Hunt Hall. Room options include triples and quads, with laundry and lounges on the first floor.

Miley Hall

Miley Hall is a traditional residence hall that accommodates first-year students and also houses the cafeteria, Miley Mart/Starbucks, bookstore and offices for the Center for Student Development, Counseling Services, Health Services and Student Affairs. Students are housed on three floors, with males on the first floor and females on the second and third floors.

 

As Salve Regina's main dining hall, the cafeteria offers daily breakfast, lunch and dinner. Features include the Mongolian grill, brick oven pizza, daily pasta specials, made-to-order deli, soups and salad bar. My Zone provides a separate pantry for students with allergies such as gluten, lactose, wheat, soy and peanut.

 

Miley Mart, a retail convenience store located in the lower level, features hot or iced Starbucks coffee and drinks, along with a complete line of snacks, candy, bottled beverages, frozen entrees, ice cream, canned and paper goods and health and beauty products.

Walgreen Hall

Walgreen Hall accommodates first-year students in suite-style living arrangements and also contains a wing dedicated to administrative office space for Campus Life, Career Development and Multicultural Programs. Housing up to 11 students, each suite shares a lounge/study area and bathroom. All floors are co-ed by suite, and residents share the laundry room with Miley Hall.

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Upperclassmen Housing

134 Webster St.

134 Webster St., the former carriage house and stables for several Ochre Point estates, accommodates junior and senior students in apartment-style housing.

204 Ruggles Ave.

204 Ruggles Ave., a four-bedroom house built in 1890, accommodates junior and senior students.

26 Lawrence Ave.

26 Lawrence Ave., a five-bedroom ranch house built in 1953, accommodates junior and senior students.

74 Victoria Ave.

74 Victoria Ave., a three-bedroom ranch house built in 1955, accommodates junior and senior students.

80 Victoria Ave.

80 Victoria Ave., a three-bedroom ranch house built in 1952, accommodates junior and senior students.

87 Victoria Ave.

87 Victoria Ave., a brick ranch house built in 1890, accommodates junior and senior students.

Carnlough Cottage

A ranch house built in 1953, Carnlough Cottage currently serves as the Language House, a living learning community that provides an opportunity for students to have a French or Spanish immersion experience while living on campus.

Carolyn House

Recently converted to a student residence, the Carolyn House accommodates junior and senior students in apartment-style housing. Built in 1883, the structure originally served as the carriage house for the Ochre Lodge estate. In 2013, Salve Regina received the Doris Duke Historic Preservation Award for its reclamation.

Conley Hall

Located near campus on Gammell Road, Conley Hall accommodates sophomore students in singles, doubles, triples and quads. Built in 1903, the property was designed by Ogden Codman Jr. for New York stockbroker Frank Sturgis.

Fairlawn Apartments

Fairlawn accommodates junior and senior students in apartment-style housing. Formerly the carriage house for Andrew Ritchie's Fairlawn estate, the structure was designed by architect Seth Bradford and completed in 1853.

Founders Hall

Founders Hall accommodates sophomore students in singles, doubles, triples and quads. Designed by the famed architectural firm of Peabody & Stearns, the Colonial Revival structure incorporates formal Georgian details with the informal ambience of a seaside villa.

French Cottage

Located on Ruggles Avenue, the French Cottage accommodates junior and senior students.

Graystone Cottages

Located on Lawrence Avenue, Graystone Cottages accommodates junior and senior students in apartment-style housing.

Moore Hall

Located on Shepard Avenue, Moore Hall accommodates sophomore students in singles, doubles, triples and one eight-person room. Built in the 1880s, the structure reflects the Queen Anne style, combining design details from the 17th and 18th centuries.

Narragansett Hall

Located on Narragansett Avenue, Narragansett Hall accommodates sophomore students in singles, doubles, triples and quads.

Narragansett I and II

Located on Ward Avenue, Narragansett I and II accommodate junior and senior students.

Nethercliffe

Nethercliffe accommodates junior and senior students in apartment-style housing. Built in 1883 for Princeton University religion professor Charles Shields, the structure was architect Richard Morris Hunt's last Newport house designed in the Stick style.

Nethercliffe Carriage House

Nethercliffe Carriage House accommodates junior and senior students. Completed in 1883, the carriage house was part of the Nethercliffe estate, built for Princeton University religion professor Charles Shields. Nethercliffe was architect Richard Morris Hunt's last Newport house designed in the Stick style. Salve Regina acquired the property, located on Ruggles Avenue, in 2004.

Ochre Lodge

A seaside villa completed in 1883, Ochre Lodge currently houses upperclassmen who are part of the multicultural living learning community. Designed by renowned local architect Dudley Newton, the structure is an excellent example of the Shingle-style villas built in Newport during the late 19th century.

Stoneacre

Stoneacre accommodates junior and senior students in apartment-style housing. Built for New York banker and railroad magnate John Ellis, Stoneacre was designed by William Appleton Potter, with Frederick Law Olmstead providing the original landscape design.

The Hedges

The Hedges accommodates junior and senior students in singles, doubles, triples and one quad. Formerly the carriage house and stables for John Thompson Spencer's Althorpe estate, the structure was designed by the famed architectural firm of Peabody & Stearns.

Wallace Hall

Wallace Hall, a Tudor Revival cottage completed in 1875, accommodates sophomore students in singles, doubles, triples and one quad. Designed by architect Frank Furness, the structure served as the carriage house and stables, and later the gardener's cottage, for the Fairholme estate.

William Watts Sherman House

The William Watts Sherman House, one of the greatest treasures of Salve Regina's campus, accommodates sophomore students in singles, doubles, triples and quads.

 

Designed by Henry Hobson Richardson and completed in 1875, the property is one of America's earliest examples of Queen Anne architecture. Richardson combined medieval European, English Renaissance and Colonial American elements to create a fanciful shingle and stucco structure enhanced by decorative woodwork. The William Watts Sherman House was added to the National Register of Historic Places and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1970.

Young Building

The Young Building houses the Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy and serves as a residence hall for upperclassmen students.

 

Built in the 1850s, the Queen Anne-style mansion has undergone several alterations over the years, including the addition of a ballroom and the installation of Tiffany stained glass windows in the great hall. In 1999, the University received a historic preservation award from the Newport Historical Society for the Young Building's restoration.

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On-Campus Shuttle Stops

Antone Academic Center (Shuttle Stop)

Conley Hall (Shuttle Stop)

Founders Hall (Shuttle Stop)

Miley Hall (Shuttle Stop)

Narragansett Ave. (Shuttle Stop)

Our Lady of Mercy Chapel (Shuttle Stop)

Reefe Hall (Shuttle Stop)

Reynolds Field (Shuttle Stop)

Rodgers Recreation Center (Shuttle Stop)

Stoneacre (Shuttle Stop)

William Watts Sherman House (Shuttle Stop)

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Parking

26 Lawrence Ave. (Student)

74 Victoria Ave. (Student)

80 Victoria Ave. (Student)

Antone Academic Center (Commuter, Faculty and Staff)

Carnlough Cottage (Student)

Drexel Lot (Commuter, Faculty and Staff)

Founders Hall (Student)

Hedges (Student)

Hunt/Reefe (Student)

Lawrence Ave. (Commuter)

Leroy Ave. (Commuter)

Leroy Ave. (Faculty and Staff)

McAuley (Faculty and Staff)

McKillop Library (Faculty and Staff)

McKillop Library (Faculty and Staff)

Miley Hall (Faculty and Staff)

Monroe Center (Commuter)

Moore Hall (Student)

O'Hare Academic Center (Faculty and Staff)

Ochre Court (Faculty and Staff)

Ochre Court (Prospective Families Overflow)

Ochre Court (Prospective Families)

Ochre Point Ave. (Communter)

Rodgers Recreation Center (Commuter, Faculty and Staff)

Ruggles Ave. (Student)

Shepard Ave. (Commuter)

Stoneacre (Student)

Stonor (Commuter, Faculty and Staff)

Wakehurst (Faculty and Staff)

Wallace Hall (Student)

Webster St. (Commuter)

Webster St. (Prospective Families)

William Watts Sherman (Student)

Young Building (Commuter, Faculty and Staff)

Young Building (Student)

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Tour Content

"Miss, Have, Want" By Pansela Schaetzle

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"Synthesize" By Kristen Maliszewski

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"Linus pro omnibus omnes pro uno" By Mary Kate Hickey

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"Mentality" By Isabella Tomlinson

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"Evolution" By Alyssa Pascerella

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"Washed Walls" By Emily Lipka

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"Kaleidoscope" By Katie Roman

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"The Artistic Mean" By Lauren Calder

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"Imperfection is Beautiful" By Diana Ostiguy

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"More" By Molly Harrington

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"View to the Past" By Zachary Mafera

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"Arboreal Endangerment" By Clara Corjulo

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